Sunday, August 23, 2015

At the end of the century, they went to the Opera house

As evidenced by the revolution with great artists of the Impressionist, wild new ideas in ballet, music, and writing, prose and poetry all set fire to the world of the creative world, and despite the amazing fires of creative going on in Berlin, Vienna, Rome, London, and elsewhere, it was Paris that everyone saw as being the center of the world of creative fire.

Paul Cornoyer
Whether it was through the painting eye, music, performance on stage, operatic vocals, classical music, poetry writing, fiction writing, the world was aglow with the work found in the living city of Paris.  This is not to say that there were not areas of Paris without corruption or decay.  There are places each century that rise and become pinnacle of civilization. 

Gustave Caillebotte
At the same time that Paris was glowing brightly, Victorian England presented a form of behavior and look, an ideal of human endeavor and belief in the greatness of the Empire of Queen Victoria.  Across the globe the British Empire extended its reach, through arms more than language.  The ideal in France was to change "men" through culture.  The French language was an agent of great civilization. 

Whether in small shops, restaurants or caf├ęs, the French could find music and dance along with their food or drink.  Paris buzzed, it was alive.


The French Opera House, the Palais Garnier was opulent, rich, gorgeous.  Attendance there was an experience in splendor, and was an invitation to experience the many layers of art.  Orchestra, Ballet, Opera, all the while surrounded by epic beauty.



No venue across the world could compare upon the grand opening.  Attendance was not only a great event, but one that would be memorable.

Edgar Degas 's works cover all of life.  From bathing, to dance, to race horses, to family life he painted scenes to record the beauty, and the moment.  His work depicts the ballet with exquisite depth.  And I leave you with his works to demonstrate it.










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